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about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house pre ♪ >> this is book tv's live coverage of the national books s festival
program, civil-rights and everyone of his major -- was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress, to see him get that program up and running and has it, ramming it through. to watch lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he not only knows all the levers to pull but has the will. in lyndon johnson's case almost vicious drive to do it, to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i do the research look what he is doing. look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i tried to explain that in my books. to me, to see him doing that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory given true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books on lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand times already as the case in the centerpiece of this book, the assassination of presid
, to be having the kind of conversations we are having now that you would have before the civil rights act of 1964 was passed and before the voting rights act. . tavis: is this a short-term strategy or long term? is this a strategy to get rid of barack obama, the first african american president? or is this a strategy they think it can win long-term for them, the strategy of voter suppression? >> i think they are playing a short-term game. it is not just about president obama but holding power every level of the electoral process. but i think what they are betting now is that some of these demographic changes are still in their infancy and we do not know yet what kind of turn out there will be among younger and hispanic voters and african americans, not only in 2012 and the gop is betting they can manipulate the electoral process in such a way that they could reduce turn out on the margins. if you look of the voter i.d. laws, the literature shows that the laws can depress voter turnout by three percentage points. that is enough to swing a close election. and they are betting that at least
for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
, will the roberts court roll back on civil rights? >>> plus, some republicans will believe just about anything as long as it hurts the president. we'll look at the ugly history of these job number conspiracy theories. stay with us. [ male announcer ] this is anna, her long day teaching the perfect swing begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day with just two pills. good eye. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you are allergic to any of it
on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice marshall -- attorney 30 marshall's -- ternate thurgood marshall -- attor
than our century's worth of progress in civil rights. now the tide is turning. inch by inch, state by state, we've been reclaiming our rights and turning back the wave of voter suppression. we saw it when the justice department stepped in to block the laws in texas, south carolina and florida. we saw it when governors in six states all but one were democrats, vetoed voter i.d. laws. they were champions of democracy to do so. and we saw it when state and federal courts rejected laws in eight states, including today's major ruling in pennsylvania. this morning a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. from going into effect before the november election. after it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of voters face the real pocket that they would not be allowed to vote. but now this unjust law will not be in effect on election day in this critical swing state. it's a stunning rebuke to republicans and their shameless attempt to rig the system. just remember one of those state top gop lawmakers slipped up and said what these laws are all about. >> voter i.d., which is g
ever complaining about ministers who are involved in the civil rights movement or in the anti- vietnam war demonstrations or about black preachers who've been so involved in american politics. is it only conservative ministers that you object to? >> no. what i object to -- [applause] -- what i object to -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek to use the power of government to impose it on others. a minister who is in civil rights or in the conservative movement, because he believes his faith instructs him to do that, i admire. the fact that the faith speaks to us and that we are moral people, hopefully, i accept and rejoice in. it's when you try to use that to undermine the integrity of private political -- or private religious faith and the use of the state is where -- for the most personal decisions in american life -- that's where i draw the line. >> thank you. now, mr. president, rebuttal. >> yes, it's very difficult to rebut, because i find myself in so much agreement with mr. mondale. i, too, want that
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
that's played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enact aed by republican-controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to actually change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos. groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there's no fraud in our elections. but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly include eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws only protect against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing states lawyers for both sides include no cases of fraud. still says john fund an expert on the subject. >> if someone walks in and votes the name of a dead person and don't need to show i.d. how likely is that dead person to
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> carmageddon 2 has come to an end just in time for this morning's rush hour in california. the demolition job that shut down a portion of l.a.'s 405 freeway hit a snag when a column collapsed. work crews completed a major component of the four-year expansion project. >>> in kentucky, a test of strength was on display. 34 teams of 20 people battled to see who could pull a 757 cargo plane 12 feet in the fastest time. the competitors showed the money as well as some muscle. all of the teams raised money for the special olympics. >>> finally, hawaiians continued their love affair with spasm hundreds gathered to build the world's
is inherently unequal. and in the 1960s opening new vistas of civil rights for individuals. and now like much of the nation, polarized and often riven with disaffection while it tends towards what is viewed as conservative world view. the court over its history has given euphoric moments of progress and unfortunate stagnation of the status quo that is desperately needed shaking. but just for clear here's to hoping that justices breyer, ginsberg, society mayor kagan can find the fifth vote that they need to move us forward not backwards. that's my view. on current tv. >>i feel like i don't even know you. >>just stay on your side of the screen, okay? >>brought to you by geico. 15 minutes could save 15% or more on car insurance. visit geico.com for a free rate >> eliot: call it a total and complete failure of the justice system. call it a modern day witch-hunt. call it anything but the way the legal system is supposed to work in this country. it's become a well-known story. in 1993 three children were brutally murdered in the woods of west memphis arkansas. three men who were later to become kno
's when they said they felt it necessary to open fire. the family civil rights attorney says the police report raises serious questions about the account. >> it's pretty clear given that physical evidence that no shots were fired by mr. blue ford. there is no gunshot residue and no evidence that the gun found near him had been fired. whoever made that statement were clearly wrong. >> police chief howard jordan released a statement regarding the shooting. it reads in part here, we have a portion we can show you "the release is not intended to address all the questions and circumstances that exist. however, critical issues regarding the investigation, providing of medical care and aid, summary witness statements, lab results, the coroner's report and independently could be rated facts and circumstances as they existed on the scene are addressed through that release." >>> 6:23. we'll be back with more in a couple minutes. a mistrial declared in a case involving a san francisco crime lab tech. we'll have details. taking a live look outside as we follow fleet week live in san francisco. lots
and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. >>> something has to change. that's the stance from civil rights attorneys asking for the feds to take over the oakland police department. that move follows a series of scathing reports and a police corruption case nearly a decade old. a request was filed that a federal judge appoint an independent receiver to take over a portion of the opd. two new reports criticizes the department's handling of officer involved shootings. >> we're saying you should. use force when it's not reasonable to do so or stopping people on the damn street because they're black when they haven't done anything else. >> oakland's police chief says the department is making progress on implements the forms, but the mayor will fight to keep the department under the chief's control. >> this was the ceremony for the archbishop at st. mary's cathedral. he was previously the bishop in oakland. 2,000 people were onhand, including officials from the vatican. out side the church, supporters were joined by gay rights activists protesting his outspoken stance against same-sex marriage.
the alien torched statute. -- alien tort statute. any civil action by agent alien's right toward the only committed and a violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the united states, this is an old statute enacted by the first congress which sat dormant for 170 years. then some civil-rights folks pick them up and they started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and report to a place in some foreign place. they come into in new york federal court and say you have jurisdiction over this and courts have been allowing some of these cases to go forward, strange as it sounds. this case raised the question -- this takes place in nigeria and the guy says he mistreated me, tortured me and so forth. these foreign oil companies were composite and help the nigerian company do this to me -- these companies work implicit. you can actually sue incorporation under this statute and that was their claim last year. the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual -- they actually said to the parties we want to consider a broader q
button topics including same-sex marriage, and a challenge to a key civil rights law, the voting rights act, requiring states with a history of discrimination to get approval from the feds before making any changes to election and voting rules. shannon covers the court for us and is live in washington. shannon, what is left to be settled here? >>guest: well, when it comes to the health care law you will remember back if june the court uphell the individual mandate and rules on other issues involving the expansion of medicaid but there are many other portions of the law the high court did not rule on including the employer mandate. that is one of the elements that the liberty university has been challenging from the going. today the court indicated it is willing to take the issue seriously by giving the administration 30 days to respond to a request by liberty university for a rehearing on that issue. >>shepard: that is one thing. what are the odds it will make it before the court? >>guest: many court watchers who believe the university has a good shot at a second chance. >> they have go
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
to get ahead of things, the plaintiffs here are attorneys, civil rights activists and others who are in regular contact with people overseas particularly people who might well be the subject of electronic surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give s
of 5 saying the regulations violent their civil rights. >> basically what does halloween have to do with the crime committed and yeah pedophiles are ickey and i don't want my kid going and trick or treating at their house but that is what i report. >> so far this is the first law to be challenged in court. >> 7:52. a wild animal running loose down a busy street in florida. this is where it happened. how a t-shirt helped end this wild situation. >> plus sal will have a check on the roads, including once again slow traffic conditions on 280 in san jose. we are the sons and daughters of farmers who made cheese; the keepers of the loafs. the people who will never lower the bar. our world started in deep green grass and rain and the hills and the waves and the big, tall trees of tillamook, oregon. we make cheese of an exquisite standard and we live in a special place... where pure and good were invented. >>> 7:55, an emu back with its owner after running loose. the bird jumped its its enclosure and did that to get it undercontrol. >> sal, no tacos on 280 is it? >> no, nothing like that
smart. ♪ . >> three months after supreme court justice moved to the right and passed obama care. pete williams has some details. >> reporter: larry, this is shaping up to be a court term dominated by civil rights beginning with a case that will be argued next week on affirmative action, colleges nationwide use it believing that a more racially diverse campus provides a better education. the court gave a green light to that practice seven years ago, but since then has become more skeptical. sandra day o'connor who has since left the court. the court will almost certainly hear a challenge to the voting rights act. the section that says states have to get federal permission before they make any changes to their elections if those states have a history of discrimination. the states say the map that's used to determine how they need to get that clearance is out of date and three years ago the court agreed with that. and almost certainly it will take up the challenge to the defense of marriage act. that's the act signed by president clint preside president clinton that says that -- >> many
to me from his cowriting the motion. shannon has legal standing because of a civil rights lawsuit he won a decade ago in the so-called riders case. that led to federal monitoring of the department and court- ordered changes he says never came. >> we simply can't wait any longer. that's why we're acting now. >> reporter: he'll file the 50- page brief plus exhibits tomorrow. the motion is scheduled for a hearing in mid december where the city of oakland is expected to fight the request. the latest in the long battle getting to this point is the monitor's just released report, criticizing the department's handling in nine police officer shootings. three of them were fatal. and it warned that some officers might face sanctions. >> i've done police shootings in many cities. but the problems with oakland are systemic and unique. >> reporter: no one from the police department responded to my request for comment today. but chief howard jordan posted this letter to the community. it says when officers fire a weapon, jordan trusts they will act professionally, ethically and with knowledge of the a
as a motion is set to be filed tomorrow to request a federal takeover of the department. the civil rights attorney who t >> i've done police shootings in many cities. but the problems with oakland are systemic, and unique. >> a hearing is set for december to discuss the motion. the city is expected to fight that request. >>> a federal judge declared a mistrial in the cocaine fraud case of a former san francisco police department crime lab technician. 62-year-old deborah madden was charged with obtaining cocaine by fraud or deception. jurors agreed she took cocaine from the laboratory in 2009. but disagree that she did so by deception. a hearing is set to discuss a pop retrial. >>> in antioch, police are looking for whoever is throwing rocks or objects from an overpass on highway 4. three vehicles have been hit so far, including an ambulance. >> reporter: on monday about 9:00 p.m., an amr ambulance was heading east on highway 4, passing under the g street overpass. an object came crashing into the windshield, shattering the glass in front of the driver. >> they didn't see anything on the r
to request a federal takeover of the department. the civil rights attorney who is co--writing the motion says the department has to change. >> i've done police shootings in many cities. but the problems with oakland are systemic, and unique. >> a hearing is set for december to discuss the motion. the city is expected to fight that request. >>> a federal judge declared a mistrial in the cocaine fraud case of a former san francisco police department crime lab technician. 62-year-old deborah madden was charged with obtaining cocaine by fraud or deception. jurors agreed she took cocaine from the laboratory in 2009. but disagree that she did so by deception. a hearing is set to discuss a pop retrial. >>> in antioch, police are looking for whoever is throwing rocks or objects from an overpass on highway 4. three vehicles have been hit so far, including an ambulance. >> reporter: on monday about 9:00 p.m., an amr ambulance was heading east on highway 4, passing under the g street overpass. an object came crashing into the windshield, shattering the glass in front of the driver. >> they didn't see an
understand how we can be relevant to their daily lives. >> reporter: there are first lady dresses, civil rights landmark and even new democratic party friendly frogs. >> we operate space telescopes for nasa. we are on the cutting edge of discovering new black holes, of understand the basis for dark matter, discover is new planets. >> reporter: whether you are a kindergartener or a ph dmplet candidate, they hope you'll find something at a new web site. -- or a ph.d. candidate, they hope you'll find something at a new web site. >> it is integrated with the way they live every day. >> they hope you will agree that it is seriously amazing. >> one of the big attractions is going away for a short time. dorothy's ruby slippers, the ones that actress judy garland wore in the wizard of oz. they are being loaned to the albert museum in london. london officials have been northing for four years. they will be included in the hollywood costume exhibit. the slippers will head to london in the next two weeks. but they will be back on display at the smithsonian by thanksgiving. those are one ever my fav
how african- americans were able to drive legislations in the civil-rights movement and say as a blueprint, let's take the amount of resources we have and you put that with voting and you have a different result. >> we me to go back to that same model and make sure we implement that in this next term. >> if anybody could jump in and answer this, and that is, let's say you go through november, let's say president, democrats, 50% holds up. 90% of black folks hold up. are you going to see african- americans and hispanics make it clear that they have to have an inside and outside game, and that is you have folks on the inside who say we are working with you, but then the extra forces on the outside who are also pushing as well to get what you want, and otherwise be risks folks saying let's don't have an extra row game, all of you are left with is an internal dane, and we can ignore it. that is a danger when it comes to getting what you want. >> i think every time you put all your eggs in one basket there's a danger they will get broken. i disagree that is what happened. the last
they say it vital their civil rights and causing outrage on both sides. >> having to put a sign on your door on halloween is like branding somebody. so when it's a scarlet letter or it's a yellow star of david for the nazi germany, you know, it's something that distinguishes everybody and actually makes them an outcast in their own community. >> i think it's a reasonable ordinance that the city has passed to help protect and keep us a safe city. >> gretchen: giving us the take is the host of "justice," judge jeanine pirro. all right. so i'm a parent. he's a parent, you're a parent. if you go out trick or troating with your kids, you night want to know if you're going to the house of a sex offender. >> you're right. the first obligation of government is protection of its citizens. as i listened to that attorney say it's like branding them, first of all, you can't even compare a predator pedophile to someone who is a victim of a holocaust. but let's get past that. they say it's a violation of their civil rights, first and 14th amendments, protected speech. that's hogwash. here is the bott
line higher education, business officials, civil rights groups that allied support for the use of race and the university of texas, swamp the number of briefs that are in opposition, but if you look at the broader public opinion, it appears that only about one-quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, you will see in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is quite broad support among the very same set of voters for preferences in college admissions based upon income. now, given these it is not surprising that we -- lord -- ward connerly has been extremely successful in his effort to ban affirmative action based upon race in a number of states. so far, those efforts are five other six times voters, when given the option has said we should end racial consideration in college admissions and public employment. including blues states. the second major problem facing affirmative-action is the legal issue by -- which will be joined in the fisher case. many people expect the u.s. supreme court is going to occu
years ago. it brought together civil rights leaders then and now. i was too young in '65, so were you, but we're not too young now. we must maintain what they won in '65. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> does romney like you? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. on the way to denver. let me start with this brand new nbc/wall street journal poll out tonight. what it shows in addition to an obama leading that's hardening is a deep concern that mitt romney said about that 47% of the country he says can't be counted on to meet its responsibility. it's that part of the country that romney has dismissed as free-loaders, moochers, takers. people, especially veteran families, people retired on social security, regular americans, that is, don't like being dismissed that way, injury added by insult. i'm joined by chuck todd and howard fineman with "the huffington post." the latest poll shows among likely voters the president leads 49% to 46% for romney. that's down net two points from two weeks ago when the pres
, engaged the senators in discussion of how he felt about the issues, and it became clear he felt the civil rights act, a thomas just think, he thought there was no such thing as a right to privacy to the constitution, and the senate by a vote of 58-42 said to conservative and he was voted down. ronald reagan nominated instead to that seat anthony kennedy, who was serving a liberal but was certainly no robert bork either. and he has had a long and distinguished career as, now the swing vote on the court. and that really, that set, that really set up the rehnquist years. accord which i wrote about in my last book, "the nine," and when i started looking at the supreme court in a serious way as a writer, i was inspired by book that i'm sure is familiar to many of you called the brethren by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book, first real behind the scenes book of the supreme court. and 15, the theme of the book was also justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand were in burger. they thought he was at pompous jerk. that sort of contention has been the rule more than the ex
decisions of our time in july the justices returned from their break and begin a new term dominated by civil rights issues. joining me from the supreme court, nbc news justice correspondent pete williams. pete, we're talking about major cases that will reshape potentially reshape policy for the united states on affirmative action, voting rights, and on gay marriage. >> very much so. let's begin with affirmative action president the court will hear that case next week. every selective university in america uses it in some manner to achieve a racially diverse campus. this is a case from the university of texas. a young high school student there did not qualify automatically as the top 10% of graduates in texas do for admission, so she was looked at in in the remainder of the other 25% of the class, race is a factor, says that's unconstitutional. nine years ago the supreme court gave the green light to colleges to use affirmative action if there were no race neutral methods to get to diversity. the question is whether the court has changed and become more conservative when they look at it they
released audiotapes that show kennedy's real views on the civil rights movement, cuban missile crisis and george romney. all of that when "now" starts in a mere 180 seconds. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing what you know. let's do it grandpa. that's why humana agents will sit down with you, to listen and understand what's important to you. it's how we help you choose the right humana medicare plan for you. because when your medicare is taken care of, you can spend more time sharing your passions. wow. [ giggles ] [ male announ
it might keep people away from the polls. civil rights groups applauded the judge's decision. >> this is a victory today for the people and a loss for the scheming and lying legislators in harrisberg who thought they could hijack the presidential election. >>> the judge could still decide the law can go forward after the presidential election. >>> in other news this morning, american airlines and its pilots' us union back at the bargaining table this week after agreeing to reopen contract talks. pilots rejected american's last offer in august. nothey will seek an industry standard contract. >>> meanwhile, american says improperly installed clamps, caused rows of seats to come loose on three flights in the last week. the airline is inspecting its planes for similar problems. >>> two scenes of economic recovery this morning including a streak in new car sales. the car of sales and trucks, it rose 13% in the last month compared to a year ago. the last time sales figures were this good february of 2008. small, e ficars are fueling the sales trend. home prices are up 4.5% nationwi
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